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Posts Tagged ‘Roman Catholic Economics’

Statue of Our Lady of Guadalupe at the US-Mexico Border

“We are Republicans, and don’t propose to leave our party and identify ourselves with the party whose antecedents have been rum, Romanism, and rebellion.  We are loyal to our flag.”

  • Dr. Samuel D. Burchard, Presbyterian Minister and Union Civil War Veteran

It had been my plan to continue my series on Critical Race Theory (CRT) this week, but events, as they say, conspired against me.  Not that I had a bad week last week.  But it was a busy week, so not one conducive to research, which is a most necessary thing if one wants to write intelligently on CRT.  Lord willing, I will take up that subject again next week.  But for now, I thought I’d return to one of my favorite yet recently neglected topics:  immigration.  More to the point, the role of the Roman Church-State in fostering immigration treason against the American people.

For a number of years now, I have argued in this space that one of the leading unindicted co-conspirators in America’s ongoing immigration disaster is the Roman Church-State.  Rome has been using immigration since at least the first half of the 19th century to subvert the republican government of the United States.  But for all Rome’s obvious efforts to this end, it is a very rare immigration writer who points this out.  

One of the best places for seeing just how aggressive Rome is in pushing costly and aggressive immigration, migration and refugee resettlement policies is United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) website under its “News” section.  I’ve been following this news feed for years, but never once have I seen a single immigration press release that did not promote immigration policies destructive to American. 

The past few months, the USCCB has been oddly silent on the immigration front.  I’m not sure why this is.  One possible explanation is related to an important rule among salesmen:  When you make the sale, stop talking. 

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“We are Republicans, and don’t propose to leave our party and identify ourselves with the party whose antecedents have been rum, Romanism and rebellion.  We are loyal to our flag.”

  • Dr. Samuel D. Burchard, 1884

Many Americans, if they have ever heard the quote about “rum, Romanism and rebellion,” have little or no idea about the context in which it was said or the object to which it was applied.  It had something to do with someone at some time way back when.

Those who know of the origin of the quote and the object at which it was directed – it was the Democrats that Burchard, a Presbyterian minister, tagged as the party of rum, Romanism and rebellion – mostly consider it to have been an impolitic gaffe that cost Republican presidential candidate James G. Blaine the 1884 election in which he was running against Democrat Grover Cleveland. 

When reading contemporary commentary on Burchard’s famous alliterative triad, what one finds universal condemnation of it.  No one, at least no one that this author has read, seems to consider the possibility that Burchard was right.

But he was right in 1884 and he is right today. 

The Democrats have been and are the party of rum, Romanism and rebellion.  In the opinion of this author, they proved it once again earlier this month with massive election rigging that, when the dust has all settled, may leave them in control of the House, the Senate and the White House. 

Over the past few weeks, there has been a great deal of commentary on various ways the Democrats may have cheated.  On the other hand, there are those, not all of them Democrats, who claim that there was no cheating, or at least no cheating that made any real difference, in the 2020 election results, that Joe Biden is the legitimate winner, and that those who say otherwise are making baseless claims and are peddling conspiracy theories. 

It is the aim of this and subsequent posts to lay out the reasons this author believes that the 2020 presidential election was rigged by the Democrats, that Joe Biden is not the winner, and that Donald Trump rightfully won the White House.   

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Former vice president Joe Biden (left) and President Donald Trump (right).NEW YORK TIMES (CUSTOM CREDIT)/ASSOCIATED PRESS (LEFT)

So when they had appointed elders in every church, and prayed with fasting, they commended them to the Lord in whom they had believed.

  • Acts 14:23

They’re almost here.  The most fraught elections in living memory.  Maybe in the history of our nation.

With so much at stake, it seemed good to me to set in order my thoughts on Tuesday’s elections.

Should Christians Vote?   

“If voting made any difference, it would be illegal.”  One hears this quote from time to time.  In my case, it pops up occasionally in Libertarian authors whose works I’ve read.  But this is not a Christian idea.  It seems to contain the idea that no matter whom you vote for, you’re going to get the exact same result.  Admittedly, there is at least some truth to this.  But to dismiss all voting as a useless exercise is, in my opinion, a major mistake.  Voting is the Christian way of choosing men to fill government offices.  This is true in both church government and civil government.

In Acts 14:23 we read, “So when they had appointed elders in every church, and prayed with fasting, they commended them to the Lord in whom they had believed.”  The Greek word translated “appointed” is kīrotonēsantes, which means to vote or to approve by show of hands.  Commentator Simon Kistemaker notes,

In Greek, the term to appoint actually means to approve by a show of hands in a congregation meeting. With the approval of an assembly, individuals were appointed to serve in a particular office.  In other words, the showing of hands was equivalent to choosing officials, in this case to serve in the government of the local church (New Testament Commentary, Acts, 525).

John Gill, commenting on this passage wrote that the election of elders and deacons was done by the members of the local congregation, “who by joint suffrages declared their choice of them by the stretching out, or lifting up of their hands, as the word [kīrotonēsantes] here used signifies, and not the imposition of them.”

Now both church government and civil government are creatures of God – as Paul notes in Romans 13, civil magistrates are “appointed by God” and are said to be his ministers – and as God has seen fit to establish republican government in both church and state, it seems a good and necessary inference to conclude that, not only does the Bible permit Christians to vote in the election of civil magistrates, but perhaps even that it is their civic duty to do so.  For if God has established a means of selecting officers, whether in the church or in the state, he has done so for the good of his people.  If we ignore God’s provision, we ignore it at our own peril. 

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