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Posts Tagged ‘Roman Catholic Politics’

Is feudalism in our future? Medieval illustration, circa 1310.

I am the vine, you are the branches.  He who abides in Me, and I in him, bears much fruit; for without Me you can do nothing.

  • John 15.5

My heart is greatly troubled.  I hate, hate, hate what is happening to my nation and yet am powerless to do anything to stop it.

Mocking arrogant and hateful sinners are exalted.  And truth?  It’s cast to the ground. 

Just this past week, Pete Buttigieg was named as Joe Biden’s nominee for Transportation Secretary.  During his press conference, Buttigieg explained his love of transportation, describing how he proposed to his husband (sic) in an airport terminal.  Said Buttigieg, “Don’t let anybody tell you that O’Hare isn’t romantic.” 

I doubt that even 5 years ago it would have been possible for someone to give a speech like this and remain politically viable.  But that’s just a measure of how fast the deluge of evil has been in so short a time. 

Mayor Pete – Buttigieg went by this title during presidential campaign season when he was running to be the Democratic presidential nominee – is a child of Satan.  Not only does he practice what is an abomination in the eyes of the Lord, but he boasts about it.  Further, he encourages other to follow him in his sin.  And it this weren’t bad enough, while he’s doing all this he has the audacity to claim to be a Christian.     

In many ways, he’s the very embodiment of the antichristian line of thinking that is set to dominate the incoming Biden administration.  Buttigieg is smart, eloquent and highly educated, with the prestige of a Harvard degree to his credit.  He holds all the fashionable ideas beloved by the elite of our day.  The press loves him.  He has, as it were, gained the world.

But he is losing his soul.

Unless he repents, he will face a Christless an eternity in hell for his many, egregious sins.

And yet for all that, in the here and now he is winning.  And not just him, but many others of his ilk as well, chief among them Joe Biden himself.     

Joe Biden is an obvious crook and the head of the Biden crime family.  In addition to his own private crimes and those of son Hunter, he’s the beneficiary of an election stolen by the Democratic party machine.  For all his evil, he is set to be rewarded by being inaugurated as the 46th President of the United States a month from today.

And while Joe Biden goes from strength to strength, Donald Trump and his supports go from failure to failure. 

Bill Barr, Trump’s Attorney General, said there was no evidence of election fraud sufficient to have made a difference in the outcome of the election. 

All the court cases have been a bust.  The Supreme Court, the strong tower in which conservatives put their trust, dismissed the suit brought by the Texas Attorney General with a backhanded slap. 

Last week, Republican Mitch McConnell, the Majority Leader in the Senate, congratulated Joe Biden on his victory in the Electoral College vote.

In short, all the governmental machinery of the establishment has declared that Biden will be the next president, and there seems to be nothing to stop it at this point. 

I have prayed that it would not come to this, but, at least as of this writing, a Biden presidency seems inevitable. 

This does not mean that Christians ought not continue to pray.  Perhaps by some means a Biden or Harris inauguration can be prevented.  January 6th is the final step in the Constitutional electoral process, where Congress finalizes the vote of the Electoral College.  What happens if Trump supporters show up in force in Washington D.C. that day?  I don’t know. 

But given the failures of the Trump legal team so far and the momentum behind Biden, a Biden presidency appears inevitable as well as all the evils that will come with it.

How did it come to this? 

Why do the bad guys win?

Some Christian commentators I heard seem to be of the opinion that evil can’t triumph.  They rightly see Joe Biden as evil and, at least if I’m hearing them correctly, seem to think for that reason he can’t carry the day. 

But in this fallen world, sometimes evil does win temporary victories.  This isn’t speculation.  You can see this right in the pages of Scripture. 

God used the Philistines and other heathen nations to subject Israel from time to time as punishment for their sins.  Things eventually got so bad that the Lord used the wicked nations of Assyria and Babylon to take the Jews into captivity for their rebellion against him. 

In the New Testament, Satan won what he thought was a victory with the death of Christ on the cross.  His victory proved short lived.

If evil can triumph in the Scriptures, it should come as no surprise that evil can score victories in our own day.  Even a brief review of recent history should show anyone just how far from the paths of righteousness governments can stray.  The Soviet Union, Nazi Germany, Communist China are but of few of the evil regimes in recent times. 

All this leads to the question, so why do the bad guys win?

We know that all of history is in the hands of God, and that nothing happens apart from his willing it to happen.  God did not merely allow Joseph Stalin to carry out his reign of terror, he caused it to happen as part of his eternal decree. 

But while appealing to the decrees of God is appropriate, usually when people wonder why it is that evil sometimes wins the day, they’re looking for something more specific.

In the Old Testament, God often used prophets to explain the reason such and such a disaster had befallen his people. 

Today, we don’t have prophets, but we do have the Word of God which gives us example after example of how God deals with nations and their rulers and how he uses them for his own purposes. 

While I don’t pretend to have the exact answer why Joe Biden stands at the precipice of the presidency, but we can look at the Scriptures for some clues why this may be the case.

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“We are Republicans, and don’t propose to leave our party and identify ourselves with the party whose antecedents have been rum, Romanism and rebellion.  We are loyal to our flag.”

  • Dr. Samuel D. Burchard, 1884

Many Americans, if they have ever heard the quote about “rum, Romanism and rebellion,” have little or no idea about the context in which it was said or the object to which it was applied.  It had something to do with someone at some time way back when.

Those who know of the origin of the quote and the object at which it was directed – it was the Democrats that Burchard, a Presbyterian minister, tagged as the party of rum, Romanism and rebellion – mostly consider it to have been an impolitic gaffe that cost Republican presidential candidate James G. Blaine the 1884 election in which he was running against Democrat Grover Cleveland. 

When reading contemporary commentary on Burchard’s famous alliterative triad, what one finds universal condemnation of it.  No one, at least no one that this author has read, seems to consider the possibility that Burchard was right.

But he was right in 1884 and he is right today. 

The Democrats have been and are the party of rum, Romanism and rebellion.  In the opinion of this author, they proved it once again earlier this month with massive election rigging that, when the dust has all settled, may leave them in control of the House, the Senate and the White House. 

Over the past few weeks, there has been a great deal of commentary on various ways the Democrats may have cheated.  On the other hand, there are those, not all of them Democrats, who claim that there was no cheating, or at least no cheating that made any real difference, in the 2020 election results, that Joe Biden is the legitimate winner, and that those who say otherwise are making baseless claims and are peddling conspiracy theories. 

It is the aim of this and subsequent posts to lay out the reasons this author believes that the 2020 presidential election was rigged by the Democrats, that Joe Biden is not the winner, and that Donald Trump rightfully won the White House.   

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Former vice president Joe Biden (left) and President Donald Trump (right).NEW YORK TIMES (CUSTOM CREDIT)/ASSOCIATED PRESS (LEFT)

So when they had appointed elders in every church, and prayed with fasting, they commended them to the Lord in whom they had believed.

  • Acts 14:23

They’re almost here.  The most fraught elections in living memory.  Maybe in the history of our nation.

With so much at stake, it seemed good to me to set in order my thoughts on Tuesday’s elections.

Should Christians Vote?   

“If voting made any difference, it would be illegal.”  One hears this quote from time to time.  In my case, it pops up occasionally in Libertarian authors whose works I’ve read.  But this is not a Christian idea.  It seems to contain the idea that no matter whom you vote for, you’re going to get the exact same result.  Admittedly, there is at least some truth to this.  But to dismiss all voting as a useless exercise is, in my opinion, a major mistake.  Voting is the Christian way of choosing men to fill government offices.  This is true in both church government and civil government.

In Acts 14:23 we read, “So when they had appointed elders in every church, and prayed with fasting, they commended them to the Lord in whom they had believed.”  The Greek word translated “appointed” is kīrotonēsantes, which means to vote or to approve by show of hands.  Commentator Simon Kistemaker notes,

In Greek, the term to appoint actually means to approve by a show of hands in a congregation meeting. With the approval of an assembly, individuals were appointed to serve in a particular office.  In other words, the showing of hands was equivalent to choosing officials, in this case to serve in the government of the local church (New Testament Commentary, Acts, 525).

John Gill, commenting on this passage wrote that the election of elders and deacons was done by the members of the local congregation, “who by joint suffrages declared their choice of them by the stretching out, or lifting up of their hands, as the word [kīrotonēsantes] here used signifies, and not the imposition of them.”

Now both church government and civil government are creatures of God – as Paul notes in Romans 13, civil magistrates are “appointed by God” and are said to be his ministers – and as God has seen fit to establish republican government in both church and state, it seems a good and necessary inference to conclude that, not only does the Bible permit Christians to vote in the election of civil magistrates, but perhaps even that it is their civic duty to do so.  For if God has established a means of selecting officers, whether in the church or in the state, he has done so for the good of his people.  If we ignore God’s provision, we ignore it at our own peril. 

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