Archive for December, 2017


As once again we find ourselves at the end of one year and the start of another, I would like to thank God for blessing me with the opportunity to serve him and his church through this blog.

In March 2018, I will celebrate nine years in the blogosphere, and that’s a pretty long time in blog years. That raises an interesting question, So just what is the average lifespan of a blog anyway? Well, as is often the case, it depends on whom you ask.

According to one post, most blogs die after 100 days. Yikes! That makes Lux Lucet something like 1000 in human years! Another post puts the average blog lifespan at 33 months. Whatever the actual average number is, it appears that this space has continued to be active well past the time when most blogs have become internet history.

And that’s a credit, not to the skill or to the perseverance of the blogger, but God who has graciously provided the opportunity, the desire, the knowledge, the wisdom and the strength to continue.


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The Annunciation_Fra Angelico_15th c.

The Annunciation, Fra Angelico, 15th cen.


One of the many reasons I have long admired the work of John Robbins was his insistence on holding, and skill at handling, question and answer sessions after his talks.

As brilliant as his lectures were, some of his best recorded comments came in the discussions that he had with audience members after he was finished speaking.

A few years ago, Tom Juodaitis was kind enough to send me recordings of a number of sermons preached by Dr. Robbins at Reformation Chapel in Unicoi, TN.

Among the sermons was a two part series on John 3:1-17. At the end of part 2, there is a discussion among Dr. Robbins, an individual whose identity I don’t know, and Tom Juodaitis concerning the incarnation.

In this discussion, Dr. Robbins explains Gordon Clark’s teaching on the incarnation. Clarks mature thinking on this subject is found in the final book he wrote just before his death in 1985, The Incarnation. Clark’s work was at the time, and continues to be, controversial. For at its heart is the idea that Jesus of Nazareth is not, as is commonly taught, one person in two natures, but two persons in one individual, one a divine person and the other a human person.

This really shouldn’t be controversial. Just recently I heard a preacher say, correctly I would add, that Jesus is 100 percent God and 100 percent man. If this is the case, and it is, then we are logically driven to the same conclusion Clark reached.

Yet many people are offended at Clark’s thought, dismissing it as Nestorianism while ignoring the logical force of his argument.

John Robbins was one theologian was persuaded by Clark’s argument and had no problem saying so. In the discussion below, Dr. Robbins is at his best, brilliantly, simply and persuasively summarizing Clark’s argument.


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Fed Speak: A Translation

Eccles Building

The Eccles Building in Washington D.C., home office of the Federal Reserve.

“We have a 2 percent symmetric inflation objective. For a number of years now, inflation has been running under 2 percent, and I consider it an important priority to make sure that inflation doesn’t chronically undershoot our 2 percent objective.” So said outgoing Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen last week in the course of assessing her on the job performance over the past year.

According to her, everything else is pretty awesome. Unemployment’s down. The economy’s growing at a 3 percent clip. The stock market may be a little pricey but it’s really nothing to get too excited about.

Why, if it weren’t for that persistently low inflation, she’d be batting close to 1.000 and having an all around MVP year here in 2017.

What shall we say to all this? It seems to me that the first order of business is to translate Yellen’s inflation comments into plain English. Academics, politicians and others who wish to hide their meaning from the general public love to use obscure language. But one of the chief jobs of any Christian teacher, whether he’s a blogger or a preacher it makes no difference, is to penetrate the fog to permit a fruitful discussion.

That said, here’s my translation of Janet Yellen’s Fed Speak: “Our objective here at the Fed is to steal 2 percent of the value of the deplorables’ savings each year by creating credit a pace that is faster than the actual rate of growth of the economy. This, combined with our holding interest rates near 5,000 year lows to keep the rubes from earnings any interest in their savings accounts, represents a one-two punch to the middle class. By employing these policy tools, we enlightened folks here at the Fed can strip mine wealth from unsuspecting nobodies, who don’t deserve what they have anyway, and put it into more worthy hands, namely, those master of the universe types who own the banks and pay our salaries. Unfortunately, I was not as successful in this regard as I would like to have been.”

Now that’s more like it. We’re finally getting somewhere. No doubt, Janet Yellen would be greatly offended by my translation, as would pretty much any other central banker, mainstream economist, investor, or financial commentator. Perhaps some of the defenders central bank orthodoxy in academia, the press and in government really do honestly think that debt-based, central bank issued, fiat currencies actually serve the public interest. But that hardly gets them off the hook. They should know better, for the evidence is overwhelming that the current system – which is of, by and for the bankers – is a massive, and profoundly immoral, wealth transfer mechanism.


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Jack Phillips_SCOTUS

Mary Torres holds up a rolling in in support of cake artist jack Phillips outside the Supreme Court n Washington on Dec. 5.  (Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press)

In perhaps the biggest story of this past week, the Supreme Court began hearing arguments in the case Masterpiece Cake Shop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission.

The case involves the Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cake Shop, who in 2012 refused to make a custom wedding cake for a same sex married couple, Charlie Craig and David Mullins. This set in motion a legal battle that saw Mr. Phillips, a Christian, dragged before the Colorado Civil Rights Commission, which did not look kindly on his appeals to free speech and the free exercise of his faith.

“I can believe anything I want,” said Commissioner Raju Jaram, “but if I’m going to do business here, I’d ought to not discriminate against people.” According to this same article, Phillips was ordered to stop discriminating against gay people, document any customers he refuses to service, provide antidiscrimination training for his staff, and report quarterly for two years.

One commissioner likened Phillips’ actions to those of the Nazis.

The Alliance Defending Freedom, the Christian legal organization representing Jack Phillips, argued this week before the Supreme Court that the baker’s First Amendment rights were violated by the Commission’s ruling. According to her, the Commission also violated Phillip’s religious liberty by attempting to force him, “to sketch, sculpt, and hand-paint cakes that celebrate a view of marriage in violation of his religious convictions.”


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